Introduction and diversity between bulbous plants

Introduction and diversity between bulbous plants


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Introduction and diversity between bulbous plants


Bulbous plants are an excellent "trump card" when you want to add color and fragrance to the garden. These plants, in fact, bloom for only one season and then remain invisible for the rest of the year: therefore, with careful planning of flowering times, you can enhance the interest in composition patterns in your garden. Bulbous plants usually bloom in spring or early summer, before shrubs and perennials. These plants are very suitable for mixed and herbaceous borders, which emphasize the ornamental value of light areas, creating color contrasts. Bulbous plants are essentially divided into four groups, namely the bulbs proper, the tubers, rhizomes and corms. The bulb can be pear-shaped or round and contains all the parts of the plant. The stem is made up of the walker from which the leaves grow upwards and the roots downwards. The leaves are also called catafilli. The outer cataphylls become papyrus or hard enclose the meaty ones. At the center of the bulb and the walker is the apical bud. The tuber is an underground stem whose marrow becomes larger and becomes a stock of reserve substances. An example is the begonia. In the external part they generally have numerous gems from which the leaves branch off when the vegetation is resumed.
The rhizome is also a modified stem, longer and wider than the tuber. From it start the roots downwards and the apical buds upwards. The corm or more exactly tuber bulb, is a short tuber on which papyrus leaves are developed that protect the buds. Roots and bulbils develop in the lower part.